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6 Key Factors for a Successful Digital Transformation

May 13, 2019


The last few years have shown an obvious need for technological modification. However, despite the interest in this process, the digital transformation leads to many difficulties in its implementation. Every company whose management makes such a decision has a long way to go.

Based on my own experience, I decided to share a number of tips that will help you avoid common mistakes and make your business digital transformation process truly successful.

Document the transition to digital

Properly introduced control elements play an important part when any initiative is implemented. The main control functions, which companies often wrongly neglect, are:

  • System status reports
  • Progress tracking
  • Assembly and deployment automation
  • Testing automation platforms
  • System performance monitoring

Observe consistency

Digital transformation can be short or long-term, but, in any case, it has to be consistent. Few companies have the required resources to implement it in a short time. Most businesses choose long-term initiatives.

Moreover, regardless of the implementation model, modifications have to be well planned and consistent – otherwise, the company risks finding itself in a difficult situation.

The transition should be planned for a reason as well, as it will simplify their economic efficiency assessment.

Ensure integration with legacy systems

It is quite hard, or even completely impossible, to instantly switch from the old to the new, especially when we are talking about a large company with a complex structure and elaborate processes. Within a certain period of time, it will probably be necessary to ensure the simultaneous functioning of a number of old system components with new ones.

At Lvivity, we are convinced that progress in small steps is a key factor that allows you to reduce risks. It is necessary to replace old systems with new services carefully, creating integration interfaces and transitional solutions.

Employee engagement is crucial

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Is the Cloud Living on the Edge?

April 29, 2019


Back when the cloud was “the next big thing,” skeptics questioned its reliability, its durability and, above all, its security. Over time, each concern has been addressed and largely resolved. The wisdom of off-premises computing is now almost a given. 

But cloud computing isn’t a religious issue. We can believe that moving critical applications and mission-critical data off local gear is strategically smart, safe and cost-effective, and still acknowledge that growing pains have tested, and will continue to test, the model. With the cloud’s maturity comes some degree of ossification and even inefficiency.

The Term Edge Computing

Over the years, I’ve sought to debunk myths and hype around cloud computing’s flavors of the month: public, private, hybrid, fog, etc. They all taste great. They’re all less filling. My point has been that terminology too often masks an intention to fix things that aren’t broken, to repackage and sell things that already exist and work well, and to find alternatives to solutions that have proven themselves eminently capable of enhancing business processes.   

As Upton Sinclair memorably put it, “it is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” Because the tendency in technology is to tease the Next Next Big Thing, the temptation to apply a bear hug to the latest and greatest can be hard to resist, whether or not we fully know what we’re embracing.  

That’s where we are with edge computing. Before this bit of jargon fully morphs into a way of doing business, IT consumers, IT professionals and IT pundits all need to understand what it is substantively and where it lapses into change-for-change’s-sake.

Recent headlines underscore the point: “Michael Dell: Why edge computing could be the next big thing”; “Edge Computing: The next big thing in networking …

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